Materials utilized for weaving Wire Cloth, Woven Wire Mesh, Wire Screen Mesh, Bolting Cloth, Screen Cloth, Fine Mesh and Micronic Filter Cloth.
 

GALVANIC CORROSION TABLE

 
When two different metals are immersed in a corrosive solution, each will develop a corrosion potential. If the corrosion potential of the two metals is significantly different, and they are in direct contact and immersed in an electrolyte, the more noble metal will become the cathode and the more active metal will become the anode. A measurable current may flow between the anode and the cathode. The corrosion rate of the anode will be increased and the cathode decreased. The increased corrosion of the anode is called "galvanic corrosion".
 

Requirements for Galvanic Corrosion

In order for galvanic corrosion to occur, three elements are required.
 
1) Dissimilar metals
2) Metal-to-metal contact
3) Metals in the same conduction solution (usually called an electrolyte)
 
If any of these elements is missing, galvanic corrosion cannot occur. If, for example, the direct contact between the two metals is prevented (plastic washer, paint film etc.) there cannot be galvanic corrosion.
 
Listed below is the latest galvanic table from MIL-STD-889 where the materials have been numbered for discussion of characteristics. However, for any combination of dissimilar metals, the metal with the lower number will act as an anode and will corrode preferentially. The table is the galvanic series of metals in sea water from Army Missile Command Report RS-TR-67-11, "Practical Galvanic Series."
 
Active  (Anodic)
  1. Magnesium
  2. Mg alloy AZ-31B
  3. Mg alloy HK-31A
  4. Zinc (hot-dip, die cast, or plated)
  5. Beryllium (hot pressed)
  6. Al 7072 clad on 7075
  7. Al 2014-T3
  8. Al 1160-H14
  9. Al 7079-T6
  10. Cadmium (plated)
  11. Uranium
  12. Al 218 (die cast)
  13. Al 5052-0
  14. Al 5052-H12
  15. Al 5456-0, H353
  16. Al 5052-H32
  17. Al 1100-0
  18. Al 3003-H25
  19. Al 6061-T6
  20. Al A360 (die cast)
  21. Al 7075-T6
  22. Al 6061-0
  23. Indium
  24. Al 2014-0
  25. Al 2024-T4
  26. Al 5052-H16
  27. Tin (plated)
  28. Stainless steel 430 (active)
  29. Lead
  30. Steel 1010
  31. Iron (cast)
  32. Stainless steel 410 (active)
  33. Copper (plated, cast, or wrought)
  34. Nickel (plated)
  35. Chromium (Plated)
  36. Tantalum
  37. AM350 (active)
  38. Stainless steel 310 (active)
  39. Stainless steel 301 (active)
  40. Stainless steel 304 (active)
  41. Stainless steel 430 (active)
  42. Stainless steel 410 (active)
  43. Stainless steel 17-7PH (active)
  44. Tungsten
  45. Niobium (columbium) 1% Zr
  46. Brass, Yellow, 268
  47. Uranium 8% Mo
  48. Brass, Naval, 464
  49. Yellow Brass
  50. Muntz Metal 280
  51. Brass (plated)
  52. Nickel-silver (18% Ni)
  53. Stainless steel 316L (active)
  54. Bronze 220
  55. Copper 110
  56. Red Brass
  57. Stainless steel 347 (active)
  58. Molybdenum, Commercial pure
  59. Copper-nickel 715
  60. Admiralty brass
  61. Stainless steel 202 (active)
  62. Bronze, Phosphor 534 (B-1)
  63. Monel 400
  64. Stainless steel 201 (active)
  65. Carpenter 20 (active)
  66. Stainless steel 321 (active)
  67. Stainless steel 316 (active)
  68. Stainless steel 309 (active)
  69. Stainless steel 17-7PH (passive)
  70. Silicone Bronze 655
  71. Stainless steel 304 (passive)
  72. Stainless steel 301 (passive)
  73. Stainless steel 321 (passive)
  74. Stainless steel 201 (passive)
  75. Stainless steel 286 (passive)
  76. Stainless steel 316L (passive)
  77. AM355 (active)
  78. Stainless steel 202 (passive)
  79. Carpenter 20 (passive)
  80. AM355 (passive)
  81. A286 (passive)
  82. Titanium 5A1, 2.5 Sn
  83. Titanium 13V, 11Cr, 3Al (annealed)
  84. Titanium 6Al, 4V (solution treated & aged)
  85. Titanium 6Al, 4V (anneal)
  86. Titanium 8Mn
  87. Titanium 13V, 11Cr 3Al (solution heat treated and aged)
  88. Titanium 75A
  89. AM350 (passive)
  90. Silver
  91. Gold
  92. Graphite
 
Noble (Less Active, Cathodic)
 

The greater the separation between the two metals listed, the greater the corrosion potential. For example, if zinc (think galvanized steel) which is an active material and near the top of the list and Silver a noble metal and near the bottom of the list were in direct contact and in the presence of an electrolyte (water), galvanic corrosion will probably occur.

 

In addition to the three elements sighted above, the relative area of each of the exposed metal surfaces is also a consideration.  If the area of the cathode (noble metal) is very large, and the anode (active metal) is very small, the current produced is likely to be very high and the anode will corrode quickly. For example, if there is a window frame made of stainless steel and it is attached with carbon steel screws, the screws will probably corrode. If the area of the cathode (noble metal) is very small, and the anode (active metal) is very large, the current produced will be very low and the anode will corrode very slowly, if at all. If the window frame is made of carbon steel and it is attached with stainless steel screws there will be very little, if any, corrosion.

 
 
 

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Last modified: August 17, 2016